The David Ross Education Trust

David Ross Education Trust schools create a rich and exciting learning environment that inspires students to become their confident, academic best.

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Bobby Moore Academy

We celebrate the diversity of our community through our aspirational learning culture so that each individual can fulfil their potential.

KS1 / KS2

Please select one of the subjects for a detailed overview

Reading

Through reading, children have a chance to develop culturally, emotionally, intellectually, socially and spiritually. Literature, especially, plays a key role in such development. Reading also enables children both to acquire knowledge and to build on what they already know. At Bobby Moore Academy, we highly value reading as a key life skill, and are dedicated to enabling our children to become lifelong readers. We believe reading is the bedrock of success in education. We use a synthetic phonics programme called Read, Write Inc. Read, Write, Inc. phonics is an inclusive literacy programme for all children learning to read. We use Talk for Reading as a methodology. It is powerful because it is based on the principles of how individuals learn. It is a fully inclusive method of teaching reading with the movement from imitation to investigation to independent application, which can be adapted to suit the needs of learners of any stage. Reading for pleasure is a key driver at our school and all teachers at Bobby Moore Academy are responsible for promoting this. 

 

Aims 

The aim of this curriculum is to promote the highest standards of language and literacy by equipping children with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to develop their love of literature.
We aim for children to be able to:

 

  • read easily, fluently and with good understanding 
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information 
  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language 
  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage 
  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences 
  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas 
  • are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate. 

 

EYFS/KS1 – Ruth Miskin Read Write Inc Phonics programme

 

Read, write Inc sessions occur daily with no exceptions across EYFS and KS1. Children working on the Read, Write Inc phonics programme take home a Read, Write Inc book bag book and a Read, Write Inc reading book, both of which are matched directly to their phonic ability. For those children who have not exited the programme, 1:1 Read, Write Inc daily tuition is put into place as a matter of priority as well as additional afternoon interventions. Those children who have exited the programme in year two will then begin working on the Read, Write Inc comprehension programme. As the children move through the programme, they are regularly assessed and grouped depending on their phonic ability. This assessment is also used to inform 1:1 Read, Write Inc daily interventions led by expert teachers of reading. All children are expected to complete home reading supported by their family with new books being sent home at least once a week. They will visit the library at least once a week and choose a book they want to share with their family. 

Implementation: The Long Term Map

The long term map, illustrates the texts being studied from Year 1 – 6. Click here to see the long-term map. 

By the time children leave Bobby Moore Academy they are competent, lifelong readers who can recommend books to their peers, have a thirst for reading a range of genres including poetry, have been exposed to tier two vocabulary and can confidently participate in discussions about books.

 

Enrichment
Our ambition is to provide our pupils with opportunities to enrich their experiences of Reading. This is achieved through our poetry recitals, author visits and World Book Day experiences.  

SEND and Disadvantaged pupils 

Our ambition is for all pupils to access the full reading curriculum. These children will be supported to provide them with full accessibility to the reading lessons. 

 

Writing

 

We intend for our pupils to leave our primary phase being independent, confident writers, who have the skills to succeed at our secondary phase or beyond. English has a pre-eminent place in education and in society and it plays a pivotal role at Bobby Moore Academy, where the children value and appreciate the central role it plays within the wider curriculum. Therefore, a high-quality education in English is vital to teach pupils to speak and write fluently so that they can communicate their ideas and emotions to others and through their reading and listening, others can communicate with them. The exposure to quality literature, especially, plays a key role in such development. Through wider reading and application of knowledge through writing, pupils have a chance to develop culturally, emotionally, intellectually, socially and spiritually.

 

Aims

The aim of this curriculum is to promote the highest standards of language and literacy by equipping children with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to develop their love of literature.
We aim for children to be able to:

 

  • read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate.

 

We use Talk for Writing as a methodology to teach writing. It is powerful because it is based on the principles of how individuals learn. We know that the starting blocks for the effective development of writing are: developing oracy through communication and language skills and excellent reading habits.  The T4W approach moves from dependence towards independence with the teacher using shared and guided teaching to develop the ability in children to write creatively and powerfully. At Bobby Moore Academy, we underpin our writing curriculum work with an established core reading spine of quality fiction, poetry and non-fiction that all children experience and draw upon. The writing curriculum is coherently sequenced so knowledge is revisited and built upon. This is developed across four strands: the composition of writing through ambitious models, grammatical subject knowledge, vocabulary development and awareness of authorial intent.
Talk 4 Writing has 3 stages: Imitation, Innovation and Invention, with the aim of the whole process being to create independent, enthusiastic authors.    

Implementation: The Long Term Map
The long term map, illustrates the units being covered from Year 1-6. They have also been colour coded to map out the repetition of specific text types/ genres in later years to ensure that the models are more challenging in content, format and vocabulary than in previous year groups. 

Click here for writing composition overview.

Enrichment
Our ambition is to provide our pupils with opportunities to enrich their experiences of English. This is achieved through our ongoing poetry recitals, author visits and World Book Day experiences.  

SEND and Disadvantaged Pupils
Our ambition is for all pupils to access the full writing composition curriculum. These pupils will be supported to provide them with full accessibility to the writing lessons.

 

Maths

 

Mathematics is essential to everyday life, critical to science, technology and engineering, and necessary for financial literacy and most forms of employment. We aim to provide a high-quality mathematics education which will provide a foundation for understanding the world, to develop an appreciation of the beauty and power of mathematics and a sense of enjoyment and curiosity about the subject. Our pupils will leave our primary academies as confident, resilient mathematicians, demonstrating conceptual and procedural fluency, with the ability to reason mathematically and efficiently solve problems.

 

Aims

The DRET Maths curriculum aims to ensure that all children:

  • become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately.
  • reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language
  • can solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions.

 

Implementation: The Long Term Plan

DRET primary academies use a Teaching for Mastery approach to support learning of mathematics.

Mastery in mathematics is:

  • Achievable for all
  • Deep and sustainable learning
  • The ability to build on something that has already been sufficiently mastered
  • The ability to reason about a concept and make connections
  • Conceptual and procedural fluency

 

Our teaching approach

Excellent teaching, within a DRET academy, is based upon the Rosenshine’s Principles of instructional teaching which is underpinned by three key sources; research in cognitive science, research on the classroom practices of master teachers and research on cognitive supports to help pupils learn complex tasks.

 

The long term map, illustrates the units being studied from Year 1 – 6. Click here to see the long-term map.

 

Cross-Curricular

Where possible, mathematical skills and ideas are practiced and applied in the real contexts provided by the wider curriculum.

 

Impact

By the end of the maths curriculum, all pupils will be confident, resilient mathematicians, demonstrating conceptual and procedural fluency, with the ability to reason mathematically and efficiently solve problems. They will be prepared to succeed in mathematics at KS3 and KS4.

 

SEND/Disadvantaged

High expectations for all pupils is a key principle which sits at the heart of our mastery approach to teaching mathematics. Pupils with additional needs are provided with additional structures to enable them to access the learning (such as working with concrete resources for longer or being provided with focused pre-teaching or same day intervention).

 

Science

 

Science plays a central role within the curriculum at DRET and is fundamental to our wider trust mission of creating aspirational and knowledge-rich pupils. Pupils are encouraged to be curious, ask questions about what they observe and will be helped to understand scientific ideas and phenomena by using different types of enquiry to answer their own questions. Our Science Curriculum is sequenced coherently so useful knowledge and skills builds through the three distinct disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. As a result of the accumulation of essential knowledge and skills pupils’ science capital and scientific understanding will be substantial and provide a secure foundation that will enable them to succeed in the next stage of their education.

 

Aims

The DRET Science curriculum aims to ensure that all children:

  • Develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
  • Develop an understanding of the nature process and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them.
  • Are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understanding the uses and implications of science today and for the future.

 

Implementation: The Long Term Plan

 

The long term map, illustrates the units being studied from Year 1 – 6. Click here to see the long-term map. 

 

Enrichment

Enrichment events are an essential part of the DRET Science Curriculum which enhances the knowledge-rich curriculum. The enrichment events provide pupils with discrete time to focus and deepen their learning, they provide opportunities for new experiences as well as nurturing and developing a thirst for learning.

 

Cross Curricular

Wherever possible, the DRET Science Curriculum is enhanced by interleaving content through other subjects. Linking Science with the other STEAM subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Maths) this allows pupils to become the critical and creative thinkers that they need to be to thrive in future society.

 

Impact

By the end of the curriculum, all pupils will have a coherent knowledge and understanding of the three science disciplines: biology, chemistry and physics. This knowledge, alongside scientific skills, will enable pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically and weigh evidence, drawing relevant conclusions.

 

SEND/Disadvantaged

Our ambition is for all of our pupils to access the full Science Curriculum. These pupils will be supported to provide them with full accessibility to the knowledge-rich Science Curriculum.

 

Geography

 

Geography plays an important role within the curriculum and is one of many subjects that help to fulfil our wider trust mission of creating aspirational and knowledge-rich pupils. Pupils will secure a significant geographical perspective through their growing knowledge of diverse places, people, resources and natural and human processes. Our Geography Curriculum is sequenced coherently so useful knowledge builds through two distinct strands; Locational Knowledge and Human and Physical Geography. As a result of the accumulation of essential knowledge pupils are provided with the frameworks and approaches that explain how the Earth’s features at different scales are shaped, interconnected and change over time, enabling them to become global citizens.

 

Aims

The aim of this curriculum is to develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places including their defining physical and human characteristics. Children will learn about processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time.

They will learn to be competent in geographical skills needed to:

 

  • Collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork
  • Interpret a range of sources of geographical information
  • Communication geographical information in a variety of ways

 

Implementation: The Long Term Plan

 

The long term map, illustrates the topics being studied from Year 1 – 6. Click here to see the long-term map. 

Enrichment

Enrichment events are an essential part of the Geography Curriculum which enhances the knowledge-rich curriculum. The enrichment events provide pupils with discrete time to focus and deepen their learning, they provide opportunities for new experiences as well as nurturing and developing a thirst for learning.

 

Cross Curricular

Wherever possible, the Geography Curriculum is enhanced by interleaving content through other subjects. Specifically, links with the Geography Curriculum enable pupils to gain a deeper understanding of places and people throughout the world and through time.

 

Impact

By the end of the curriculum all pupils will have a coherent geographical knowledge and understanding and a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives.

 

SEND/Disadvantaged

Our ambition is for all of our pupils to access the full Geography Curriculum. These pupils will be supported to provide them with full accessibility to the knowledge-rich Geography Curriculum.

 

History

 

History plays a central role within the curriculum at DRET and is fundamental to our wider trust mission of creating aspirational and knowledge-rich pupils. Pupils will secure a significant historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts and understand connections between local, regional, national and international history. Our History Curriculum is sequenced coherently so useful knowledge builds through three distinct strands; Ancient and World History, British History and Civil Rights and Equalities. As a result of the accumulation of essential knowledge pupils’ cultural capital and historical disciplines will be substantial and will provide a secure foundation that will enable them to succeed in the next stage of their education.

 

Aims

The DRET History curriculum aims to ensure that all children:

  • Gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world which helps to stimulate children’s curiosity to know more about the past.
  • Learn how to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement.
  • Begin to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.

 

Implementation: The Long Term Plan

The long term map, illustrates the topics being studied from Year 1 – 6. Click here to see the long-term map. 

 

Enrichment

Enrichment events are an essential part of the DRET History Curriculum which enhances the knowledge-rich curriculum. The enrichment events provide pupils with discrete time to focus and deepen their learning, they provide opportunities for new experiences as well as nurturing and developing a thirst for learning.

 

Cross Curricular

Wherever possible, the DRET History Curriculum is enhanced by interleaving content through other subjects. To understand British Society today, pupils will have a secure understanding of how historical events have created modern society.

 

Impact

By the end of the curriculum all pupils will have a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world and will have acquired the disciplinary skills of Historians being able to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement.

 

SEND/Disadvantaged

Our ambition is for all of our pupils to access the full History Curriculum. These pupils will be supported to provide them with full accessibility to the knowledge-rich History Curriculum.

 

PSHE

At Bobby Moore Academy we use the Jigsaw programme as our PSHE scheme which also offers opportunities for children’s spiritual, moral, social and cultural (SMSC) development. Jigsaw teaches PSHE through mindfulness and provides children with a curriculum where they build upon their learning of each topic every year that they are at Bobby Moore Academy. Our aim for PSHE is to ensure that all the children we teach become well rounded citizens who are able to have a positive impact on our community.

 

Aims

 

How would children benefit if they could be aware of their thoughts and feelings as they happen, in the present moment, on purpose with no judgement?
This is mindfulness and is the and a focus of the Jigsaw programme. It can be learnt, and techniques to develop it taught. It also needs to be practised. We believe mindfulness is a vital tool for life: not only does it support the regulation of emotion and build emotional resilience but also enhances focus and concentration; both helping to optimise learning.

Mindful children can more readily choose their responses to situations rather than react while caught up in the thought-flows and emotions.
In Jigsaw PSHE, mindfulness is developed through the ‘Calm Me’ time in each piece (lesson). This consists of breathing techniques, awareness exercises and visualisations – all tried, tested and very enjoyable activities for children and teachers alike.

 

Six Puzzles

 

There are six Puzzles in Jigsaw that are designed to progress in sequence from September to July:

Autumn 1: Being Me in My World

Autumn 2: Celebrating Difference (including anti-bullying)

Spring 1: Dreams and Goals

Spring 2: Healthy Me

Summer 1: Relationships

Summer 2: Changing Me

 

Implementation: The Jigsaw Approach

 

The Jigsaw Approach illustrates the topics being studied from Year R – 6. Click here to see the Jigsaw Approach. 

ART

At Bobby Moore Academy, art is a valued subject which we believe is an integral part of our pupil’s education. It engages and challenges all our pupils and embodies some of the highest forms of human creativity. We believe that it unlocks our pupil’s potential, allows them to express their creativity and supports their mental health, which is key to our school ethos. We believe that art gives our pupils their own voice, a sense of escapism and provides them with the opportunity to see the world around them in a different light. To tap into our pupil’s creativity and truly unlock their potential, we strive to provide outstanding opportunities and to reflect our schools culture and community through the artists we choose.

 

The focus of our arts curriculum is to develop proficiencies in drawing, painting, colour theory, shade and sculpture, therefore equipping pupils with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. Alongside these skills we will develop children’s knowledge of a range of artists and designs, their critical awareness and ability to critic their own work as well as the work of others. Pupils will learn about know how art and design both reflect and shape our history, and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation. The artists chosen provide pupils with positive role models that they can aspire to emulate, as well as developing their understanding of their own and others’ cultural heritages.

 

Implementation

Children will develop their understanding of the visual language of art through effective teaching and carefully thought out sequences of lessons which build on prior learning from the previous year. Pupils understanding of the visual elements of art and design (line, tone, texture, colour, pattern, shape, 3D form) will be developed by providing an accessible and engaging curriculum.

 

We teach a knowledge rich, skills-based curriculum based on the talk for writing methodology (talk for art). Lessons are taught in blocks on a termly basis and focus on studying a particular artist or art movement. Using the talk for art methodology, children are first explicitly taught the skills they will be using that term, they are then tasked with re-creating a piece of art from the artist we will be studying, focusing on the skill or technique for that term – this is known as the imitation stage. Following on from this in the innovation stage, children will then change a particular aspect of the key piece – this may be the style, subject or material used. Finally, children will combine the skills they have learnt with the knowledge gained about the artist, or art movement, to create their own unique piece of art work. The evidence of their work is collected in their art sketch book which follows the children through the school, whilst the vocabulary that they have gained will be recorded in their art dictionary, this will also follow them through the school.

 

Pupils will develop their critical awareness during termly art history lessons, which are taught alongside the practical lessons and focus on the same artist or art movement that they are studying. These lessons also follow a structure based upon aspects of the talk for writing methodology. This allows children the opportunity to learn about the life of their artist, express their initial reactions, likes and dislikes as well as providing extended writing opportunities, this is recorded in the pupils learning journeys.

 

Implementation: The Long Term Plan

The long term map, illustrates the topics being studied from Year 1 – 6. Click here to see the long-term map. 

EYFS

The teaching of Art and Design is practical, playful and inclusive with support and challenge from adults in class sessions, small groups and working with individuals. There is a combination of adult-led, teacher taught sessions as well as a wealth of stimulating continuous provision opportunities when adults scaffold learning through skilful interactions and questioning. Throughout all of these areas of learning and at the heart of our EYFS are the “Characteristics of Effective Learning”.

 

Enrichment

Enrichment opportunities in school include:

  • School events:
    • o An art show for families and careers after each art unit
    • o Visits to galleries
    • o The opportunity to take part in whole school art projects

 

Cross Curricular

Where appropriate, the Art curriculum is used to enhance the learning in other subjects. e.g. artists linked to the historical period that is being studied or styles of art linked to geographical regions that are being studied. Art is also a very useful tool in PSHE subjects.

 

Impact

It will be evident over time that the progress, knowledge and skills of pupils will increase between EYFS and Year 6. When the curriculum was planned, the National Curriculums Key Stage Expectations were referred to, which ensures progression across the school. Impact will be assessed through a multi-faceted approach including end of unit art shows, informal observations in lessons, opportunities through practical art lessons, listening to children talking and watching children respond. Evidence is built up by within their sketch books which will stay with them throughout their time at the school. These should show development of artistic skills and improvement in their knowledge of artists and genres. Pupil voice is also important in the review of provision for art.

 

The Art lead and SLT undertake regular learning walks to monitor the quality and impact of the Art Curriculum and assess the extent to which pupils imitate the work of well-known artists, innovate on these pieces, create their own art pieces and recognise various artists and genres. 

 

SEND/Disadvantaged

Our ambition is for all our pupils to access the full Art curriculum.  All teachers support and facilitate access to the Art curriculum by differentiation, adult support, and appropriate choice of equipment as necessary. There is a wide range of capability and confidence across the school; tasks and activities are designed to allow students to engage at their own level and make progress.

Computing

Computing plays a central role within the curriculum at DRET and is fundamental to our wider trust mission of creating aspirational and knowledge-rich pupils. Pupils will secure an understanding of the use of technology as well as staying safe and making the correct choices. The Computing Curriculum is sequenced coherently so useful knowledge builds through three distinct strands; Programming, Multimedia and technology in our lives with e-safety underpinning all of these strands. As a result of the accumulation of essential knowledge pupils’ cultural capital and understanding of computing, disciplines will be substantial and will provide a secure foundation that will enable them to succeed in the next stage of their education.

 

The DRET Computing curriculum aims to ensure that all children:

  • Have a secure understanding of how to stay safe online and in the real world, implementing guidance that has been taught.
  • Gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of technology and how to use it effectively.
  • Learn how to ask perceptive questions, think critically, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement.
  • Have a concrete understanding of programming and how programmes are written, refined and developed.

 

Implementation

 

Teaching Style

Excellent teaching, within a DRET academy, is based upon the Rosenshine’s Principles of instructional teaching which is underpinned by three key sources; research in cognitive science, research on the classroom practices of master teachers and research on cognitive supports to help pupils learn complex tasks.

 

EYFS

The teaching of Technology is practical, playful and inclusive with support and challenge from adults in class sessions, small groups and working with individuals. There is a combination of adult-led, teacher taught sessions as well as a wealth of stimulating continuous provision opportunities when adults scaffold learning through skillful interactions and questioning. Throughout all of these areas of learning and at the heart of our EYFS are the “Characteristics of Effective Learning”.

 

Enrichment

Enrichment events are an essential part of the DRET Computing Curriculum which enhances the knowledge-rich curriculum. The enrichment events provide pupils with discrete time to focus and deepen their learning, they provide opportunities for new experiences as well as nurturing and developing a thirst for learning. 

 

Cross Curricular

Wherever possible, the DRET Computing Curriculum is enhanced by interweaving content through other subjects. To understand British Society today, pupils will have a secure understanding of how computing fits into and supports modern society.

  

Impact

By the end of the curriculum all pupils will have a coherent knowledge and understanding of Technology and that within the wider world. They will have acquired the disciplinary skills by being able to ask perceptive questions, think critically, sift arguments and develop perspective and judgement.

 

This will be assessed through a multi-faceted approach including; skillful questioning lesson by lesson, retrieval practices, and summative disciplinary tasks such as essays.  Evidence of this learning will be recorded and the basis of moderation within the year at school and trust level.

 

Leaders will monitor the quality and impact of the Computing Curriculum through regular pupil voice and assess the extent to which pupils know more and remember more.

 

SEND/Disadvantaged

Our ambition is for all of our pupils to access the full Computing Curriculum.  These pupils will be supported to provide them with full accessibility to the knowledge-rich Computing Curriculum.

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY

Design & Technology (DT) plays an important role within the curriculum at DRET and is one of many subjects that help to fulfil our wider trust mission of creating aspirational and knowledge-rich pupils.  Children have planned opportunities to use their creativity and imagination, to design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts. The DT Curriculum includes links to designs and designers throughout history, enabling children to critically reflect upon and evaluate their own designs.  We aim to, wherever possible, link work to other disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art. This gives the learning purpose and relevance to the children.

 

The DRET DT curriculum aims to ensure that all children:

  • develop technical knowledge and vocabulary in relation to structural design, mechanical and electrical systems and the integration of technology and food production and nutrition
  • develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world
  • build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users
  • critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others
  • understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook
  • develop the collaborative working skills needed for the world of work

 

Implementation

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, we teach the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an interactive process of designing and making. When designing and making, the school uses a standardised planning format to ensure the pupils are familiar with the design cycle:

  • Design – use research and develop design criteria to design for a purpose and communicate their ideas through a range of mediums.
  • Make – use a wider range of tools and equipment with accuracy and use a wider range of materials and components according to their qualities.
  • Evaluate – evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.

 

The long term map, illustrates the topics being studied from Year 1 – 6. Click here to see the long-term map. 

Teaching Style

Excellent teaching, within a DRET academy, is based upon the Rosenshine’s Principles of instructional teaching which is underpinned by three key sources; research in cognitive science, research on the classroom practices of master teachers and research on cognitive supports to help pupils learn complex tasks.  Children also have time to develop practical skills and develop these through modelling from the teacher and then engagement in focused practical tasks.

  

EYFS

The teaching of DT is practical, playful and inclusive with support and challenge from adults in class sessions, small groups and working with individuals. There is a combination of adult-led, teacher taught sessions as well as a wealth of stimulating continuous provision opportunities when adults scaffold learning through skillful interactions and questioning. Throughout all of these areas of learning and at the heart of our EYFS are the “Characteristics of Effective Learning”.

  

Enrichment

Enrichment events are an essential part of the DRET DT Curriculum which enhances the knowledge-rich curriculum. The enrichment events provide pupils with discrete time to focus and deepen their learning, they provide opportunities for new experiences as well as nurturing and developing a thirst for learning. We have partnered with Keep Britain Tidy https://www.keepbritaintidy.org/home where they have run workshops with our classes and raised the profile of environmental issues within D&T workshops.

 

Cross Curricular

Wherever possible, the DRET DT Curriculum is enhanced by interleaving content through other subjects. Specifically, links with the DRET Science, Maths and Computing Curriculum enable pupils to gain a wider understanding of the importance of these STEM subjects in the modern world.

 

Impact

By the end of the curriculum all pupils will have a coherent technological knowledge and range of skills and will see the potential and believe in the opportunities available for them to become the designers of the future.

 

This will be assessed through a multi-faceted approach including; half termly quizzes pre and post units of study, skillful questioning lesson by lesson, focused practical tasks and purposeful evaluation.  Evidence of this learning will be seen in the designs, completed products and evaluations from the children.

 

Leaders will monitor the quality and impact of the DT Curriculum through regular pupil voice and assess the extent to which pupils know more and remember more.

 

SEND/Disadvantaged

Our ambition is for all of our pupils to access the full DT Curriculum.  These pupils will be supported to provide them with full accessibility to the DT Curriculum.

MFL

Modern Foreign Language plays a vital role within the curriculum at Bobby Moore Academy and is one of many subjects that will help to fulfil our wider trust mission of creating a curriculum that is broadening the horizons of young people within our academy. The teaching of languages to early learners is now widely recognised as a significant contributory factor in developing literacy, building self-confidence and broadening cultural horizons. Through learning a foreign language there are further benefits in terms of gains in listening and speaking skills, laying the foundations for future language learning.

 

Learning a foreign language is a liberation from insularity and provides an opening to other cultures. Our MFL curriculum promotes pupils’ curiosity and deepens their understanding of the world around them. Learning Spanish at Bobby Moore Academy will enable pupils to express their thoughts and ideas in another language and communicate these in both speech and in writing.

 

The DRET MFL curriculum aims to ensure that all children:

  • understand and respond to spoken and written language from a variety of authentic sources
  • speak with increasing confidence, fluency and spontaneity, finding ways of communicating what they want to say, including through discussion and asking questions, and continually improving the accuracy of their pronunciation and intonation
  • can write at varying length, for different purposes and audiences, using the variety of grammatical structures that they have learnt
  • discover and develop an appreciation of a range of writing in the language studied.

Implementation

Our MFL curriculum is designed to progressively develop children skills in languages, through regular taught lessons. Children progressively acquire, use and apply a growing bank of vocabulary organised around topics. Children are encouraged and supported to develop their speaking and listening skills through conversational work, singing activities and games. As confidence and skill grows, children record their work through pictures, captions and sentences.

The long term map, illustrates the topics being studied from Year 1 – 6. Click here to see the long-term map. 

 

Career Professional Development

We develop a subject knowledge amongst all staff which is achieved through; comprehensive middle leadership development, a focus on developing all teachers’ subject knowledge and the provision of high-quality planning resources.

 

Teaching Style 

Excellent teaching, within a DRET academy, is based upon the Rosenshine’s Principles of instructional teaching which is underpinned by three key sources; research in cognitive science, research on the classroom practices of master teachers and research on cognitive supports to help pupils learn complex tasks. 

  

Enrichment

Enrichment events are an essential part of the DRET Curriculum which enhances the curriculum. The enrichment events provide pupils with discrete time to focus and deepen their learning, they provide opportunities for new experiences as well as nurturing and developing a thirst for learning. 

 

Cross Curricular

Wherever possible, the MFL Curriculum is enhanced by interleaving content through other subjects. Specifically, links with Literacy, Mathematics, Design and Technology, Geography, History and PHSE where pupils will learn to develop good relationships and respect and values.

 

Impact

The impact of our MFL curriculum is that children are encouraged to understand to understand the relevance of what they are learning in languages. It relates to everyday life and travel and ensures the pupils are aware of how it can support them in another country to talk to a someone in their native language.

Teachers foster an enjoyment of languages through a variety of lessons including interactive, singing and role play. Progression through a topic should be evident in the development of key skills and acquisition of main vocabulary. Evidence is kept of children’s work in books and ideas and information will be presented orally to a range of audiences.

Leaders will monitor the quality and impact of the MFL curriculum through regular pupil voice and assess the extent to which pupils know more and remember more.

 

SEND/Disadvantaged

Our ambition is for all pupils to access the full MFL curriculum. These pupils will be supported to provide them with full accessibility to the knowledge-rich MFL curriculum.

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Religious Education plays a central role within the curriculum at DRET and is fundamental to our wider trust mission of creating aspirational and knowledge-rich pupils. Pupils will secure a significant perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts and understand the connections, similarities and differences between faiths. Our Religious Education Curriculum which is sequenced coherently so the children develop religious literacy by investigating and understanding religion and beliefs, reflecting and interpreting human experience in relation to identity, belonging, diversity, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments. At DRET we consistently promote children’s spiritual, moral, social and cultural development helping them to have a greater understanding of their place in the world, and their rights and responsibilities to other people. As a result of the accumulation of essential knowledge, pupils’ cultural capital and religious understanding will be substantial and will provide a secure foundation that will enable them to succeed in the next stage of their education.  We want them to know how religious education promotes tolerance and combats prejudice, producing positive citizens, preparing them for adult life, employment and life-long learning. We follow the Newham Religious Education Curriculum.

  

The DRET Religious Education curriculum aims to ensure that all children:

  • Acquire and develop knowledge of the principal religions and world views.
  • Develop an understanding of the influence of the beliefs, values and traditions on individuals, communities, societies and cultures.
  • Develop attitudes of respect towards other people who hold views and beliefs different from their own.
  • Learn how to ask perceptive questions, think critically, consider evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgments about religious issues.
  • Begin to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges

 

 

EYFS

 

The teaching of these areas of learning is practical, playful and inclusive with support and challenge from adults in class sessions, small groups and working with individuals. There is a combination of adult-led, teacher taught sessions as well as a wealth of stimulating continuous provision opportunities when adults scaffold learning through skillful interactions and questioning. Throughout all of these areas of learning and at the heart of our EYFS are the “Characteristics of Effective Learning”.

 

 

Implementation

We plan our Religious Education syllabus around our own community carefully considering the demographic of where we are and considering the belief of our children before deciding on what to teach. As well as Christianity we teach the five other major religions.

 

There are two attainment targets in Religious Education. To achieve an outstanding knowledge of Religious Education we have a good balance between learning about religion and belief as well as learning from religion by questioning and reflecting upon purpose, truth as well as belonging.

 

Although Religious Education contributes to other subjects it is not defined by or confined to them. Similarly, although Religious Education and Collective Worship can enrich each other, Religious Education is not replaced by or delivered through Collective Worship

 

Teaching Style

 Excellent teaching, within DRET, is based upon the Rosenshine’s Principles of instructional teaching which is underpinned by three key sources; research in cognitive science, research on the classroom practices of master teachers and research on cognitive supports to help pupils learn complex tasks.

 

Enrichment

Enrichment events are an essential part of the DRET Religious Education which enhances the knowledge-rich curriculum. The enrichment events provide pupils with discrete time to focus and deepen their learning, they provide opportunities for new experiences as well as nurturing and developing a thirst for learning. Religious Education is also linked closely to the values of the DRET, aspiration, ambition, courage and respect. Assemblies will highlight the importance of different religions and invite members from different faiths to talk about how they celebrate significant religious events in their community.

 

Cross Curricular

 Wherever possible, the DRET Curriculum is enhanced by interweaving content through other subjects. To understand British Society today, pupils will have a secure understanding of how different faiths have contributed to modern society.  Although links to beliefs are not made in different subjects explicitly, the morals and values of the different beliefs are part of the trust and are embedded in each and every subject.

 

 

Impact

 

By the end of the curriculum all pupils will have a coherent knowledge and understanding of the six world religions and will have acquired the skills of philosophers being able to ask perceptive questions, think critically, consider evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. Pupils will have a broader understanding of the different religions which will reduce prejudicism within their community and enable them to respect one another after discovering more about the way they live. Educating pupils about the different beliefs will also help them articulate their own beliefs and enable them to make links and respect the action of others.

 

Leaders will monitor the quality and impact of the Religious Education Curriculum through regular pupil voice and assess the extent to which pupils know more and remember more.

 

SEND/Disadvantaged

Our ambition is for all of our pupils to access the full Religious Education Curriculum.
These pupils will be supported to provide them with full accessibility to the knowledge-rich Religious Education Curriculum.

 

MUSIC

Music plays a central role within the curriculum at Bobby Moore Academy (Primary) and in all DRET schools. It is fundamental to the wider Trust mission of creating aspirational and knowledge-rich pupils. Pupils will perform, listen to, review and evaluate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions, including the works of the great composers and musicians. Pupils will also learn to sing and to use their voices, to create and compose music on their own and with others, have the opportunity to learn a musical instrument, use technology appropriately and have the opportunity to progress to the next level of musical excellence. Pupils will understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated, including through the interrelated dimensions (elements of music): pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure and appropriate musical notations.

 

The DRET Music curriculum aims to ensure that all children:

  • Sing with a wide range and with a variety of expression
  • Sing confidently in parts
  • Read staff notation
  • Experience playing an orchestral instrument in class ensemble (and to be given the opportunity to continue learning the instrument in smaller groups/one-to-one)
  • Hear a youth or professional orchestra live
  • Hear a youth, church or professional choir live

 

In addition, as the school grows there will be opportunities for those children showing musical aptitude to be able to develop their musicianship through singing in choirs, playing in instrumental ensembles and joining local and national musical groups. The school’s Music Lead, guided by a DRET Primary Music Specialist, will direct these children to such ensembles.

 

 

Implementation

The music curriculum is delivered by class teachers who are supported by the DRET Primary Music Specialists.

 

Music is split into three inter-connected areas which include:-

  • 1) Classroom Music (Ongoing Skills and longer Units)
  • 2) Musical Events and Opportunities
  • 3) Enrichment

 

Classroom Music Curriculum

All classes receive music lessons every week known as ‘Classroom Music’ delivered by their class teacher. At the heart of the DRET Music Curriculum and central to progression is the teaching and practising of ‘Ongoing Skills’ (min3 x 10mins per week) for every year group. Alongside the development of these skills, there are 3 longer taught Units per year group. Units and Ongoing Skills have been created by the Primary Music Specialists using the DRET Music Year Group Expectations to ensure progression across the school. To support the teaching of the subject by class teachers, the DRET Primary Music Team provide training and planning including links to ‘in-house’  online resources, and quality national initiatives such as Voices Foundation, BBC Ten Pieces and Friday Afternoons.

 

EYFS

Using Music Development Matters (2018) as the core document, the DRET Music Team provides suggestions and resources for use by all EY settings and practitioners. The resources where appropriate, link to the planning for Early Learning Goals in the other curriculum areas such as songs about animal life cycles, using rhyme, or counting. Musical opportunities are part of planning for Continuous Provision and there are also some taught whole class and small group sessions.

For Reception teaching, the year group Expectations have been divided into termly objectives with linked resource suggestions. Each term has a main musical focus, such as Exploring Sounds or Exploring Pulse and Tempo, and suggested repertoire linking to the wider EY curriculum e.g. Minibeasts or Kings and Queens. Early Years practitioners are encouraged to add their own ideas and ideas from the children, further enhancing the experience for all concerned.

 

KS1/KS2

In KS1 the teaching and practising of ‘Ongoing Skills’ happens in daily 10min sessions led by the class teacher. Alongside the development of these skills, there are 3 longer taught Units per year group (6 lessons per Unit)[these longer units will be taught in academic year 2021-2022]

In KS1 the 3 longer taught Units cover the interrelated dimensions (elements of music) over the course of each year. The planning takes the children from the more familiar e.g. body percussion, copying the adult’s example and graphic notation to the use of untuned percussion, tuned percussion, and introduction to the instruments of the orchestra, standard notation, improvisation and composing.

(Each Unit consists of a minimum of 6 x 30 minute lessons in KS1)

 

As the school grows to include KS2 children, the longer taught Units will further develop voice and instrumental work as well as building more opportunities to progress with regard to improvisation and composition. Each taught Unit will also have its own focus:-

Autumn = Rhythm and Pulse

Spring = Interrelated dimensions of music (elements of music)

Summer = Structure and Composition

(Units consist of a minimum of 6 x 45 minutes in KS2)

Ongoing skills for T1, T3 and T5 will be built into each unit of work.

Ongoing Skills for T2, T4 and T6 are expected to be delivered separately through a minimum of 3 x 10mins lessons per week. These lessons will include a singing lesson, a pulse and rhythm lesson and a listening and appraising lesson.

 

Longer ‘Taught’ Unit overview:

 

 

Song Bag

Each class has a song/music bag. The idea of the bag is to keep a record of the progression of songs that are learnt during the ‘Ongoing skills’ sessions and throughout the children’s time at BMAP. Each time a new song is learnt the name of the song is simply written on a piece of card and placed in the bag. At any point a song can be pulled from the bag and the children then sing that song. Each year group writes their songs on the following coloured card. The information in the bag will follow the class from EYFS to Year 6 and be an indication of progression of repertoire.

 

EYFS            - Red

YEAR 1         - Orange

YEAR 2         - Yellow

YEAR 3         - Green

YEAR 4         - Blue

YEAR 5         - Indigo

YEAR 6         - Violet

 

Musical Events and Opportunities

Singing is at the core of our music provision and we hold one whole school Singing Assembly per week, singing a wide variety of seasonal songs using repertoire from resources such as Sing Up, Voices Foundation, NYCOS and songs from other cultures. We also use singing to enhance the learning in other subjects where appropriate, for example number songs in maths.

 

Performance opportunities are an essential part of the Music at Bobby Moore Academy.

     The main events in the Primary School include: 

Opportunities to work with students from Bobby Moore Academy Secondary will also grow over time e.g. samba performances workshops and performances.

 

Enrichment

Enrichment opportunities will increase as the school grows. Working with Newham Music Hub, piano lessons are offered to all children from Reception and violin lessons for children from Year 2 will start in 2021. A regularly rehearsing all-comers KS1 choir will start as soon as possible, and children will be able to participate in wider opportunities provided by the Trust such as the Primary Music Festivals and Carol Services.

Partnerships with external music and other organisations

 Instrumental provision is provided by Newham Music Hub and opportunities to participate in Hub events will increase as the children get older. As part of the East Bank Project, BMA is excited to be building relationships with organisations including the BBC Symphony Orchestra, with BBC musicians providing online workshops with each class and visiting the school.

The school has also applied for and been awarded a School Music Grant from the London Borough of Newham. The money is being used to buy books, instruments and other resources to both enrich curriculum music lessons, and to enable clubs to develop as the school grows.

 

 

Teaching Style

 Excellent curriculum music teaching in DRET schools is based upon the principles of the Kodaly Method; music is taught from a young age, music is taught in a logical and sequential manner, children look forward to learning music, the voice is the most accessible universal instrument and so singing is at the heart of lessons. Music lessons are practical with all children taking part in active sessions which include listening, singing and playing instruments.

 

 

Cross Curricular

 Music is an important part of a broad and balanced curriculum and is used to enhance the learning in other subjects e.g. counting, topic, alphabet and rhyming songs. Listening to the music of people from different times and places adds another aspect to other curriculum areas including art, history and geography. Music is also used as a tool in PSHE subjects and assemblies.

 

 

SEND/Disadvantaged

Our ambition is for all of our pupils to access the full Music Curriculum.  All teachers support and facilitate access through appropriate differentiation, adult support, and suitable choice of equipment as necessary e.g. ear defenders are available for those with heightened noise sensitivity. There is a wide range of capability and confidence across the school; tasks and activities are designed to allow students to engage at their own level and make progress.

 

 

Impact

 

Pupils’ progress in both knowledge and skills will increase between EYFS and Year 6. The curriculum planning is thorough and sequential with children building on previous learning, and well-taught lessons will result in pupil progress. Teacher CPD is important and ongoing. Pupils’ progress is monitored through a multi-faceted approach including termly performances, observations in lessons, opportunities through practical music-making, listening to children talking and playing, and watching children respond. Evidence of this is built up by keeping some sound and video recordings. These show development of musical skills, particularly singing, and improvement in social skills such as cooperation and team-work. Across the Trust there is evidence of the positive impact on pupil wellbeing, confidence, self-esteem and attitudes towards learning.

 

Over time, student progress will also be evidenced through the number accessing musical learning at a higher level. This includes singing in a Trust wide choir, church choir or local Music Hub choir or playing an

instrument in Hub ensembles. The school Music Lead will hold lists of such participation and work with the DRET Music Team and the local Music Hub to suggest progression routes for children.

 

The Music Lead and SLT undertake regular learning walks to monitor the quality and impact of the music curriculum. They use these and regular pupil voice opportunities, to assess the extent to which pupils sing, play, compose, and recognise various composers/musicians and their music.

PE

Physical Education (PE) and sport play an important role within the curriculum at Bobby Moore Academy. The subject is one of the main areas that helps us to fulfil the wider David Ross Education Trust (DRET) mission of encouraging pupils to succeed and excel. Our extensive PE and school sport curriculum provide opportunities for pupils to become physically confident in a way which supports their mental and physical well-being. Children of all sporting ability have the opportunity to compete in a wide range of activities, which helps them to build their characters and resilience, along with embedding values such as fairness and respect.

 

Our PE curriculum aims to ensure that all children:

 

  • Develop competencies to excel in a broad range of physical activities.
  • Are physically active for sustained periods of time.
  • Engage in competitive sports and learn the values of teamwork, resilience and how to cope with failure and success.
  • Lead healthy, active lives.

 

Implementation

The long term map, illustrates the topics being studied from Year 1 – 6. Click here to see the long-term map. 

 

Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS)

In EYFS the focus is on developing fundamental movements skills (FMS) through our 4 Horizon PE strands of balance, movement, throwing/catching/rolling and dribbling and striking. We adopt a joined-up approach, with staff bringing together a multitude of methods to improve children’s physical development in EYFS. Our PE curriculum is at the heart of this, with staff linking the subject to their key assessment framework (Development Matters). PE enables staff to further observe and assess physical age-related expectations, along with it being a vehicle of intervention to develop and improve many of these essential age-related expectations during the academic. The teaching of PE is practical, playful and inclusive with support and challenge from adults in class sessions, small groups and working with individuals. There is a combination of adult-led, teacher taught sessions, as well as a wealth of stimulating continuous provision opportunities when adults scaffold learning through skilful interactions and questioning. Throughout all these areas of learning and at the heart of our EYFS are the “Characteristics of Effective Learning”. EYFS continuously works with children and their parents to promote and develop that “Active Start Phase” (see long-term plan). This is achieved through PE homework and parent engagement via Tapestry. Giving our children an extensive PE programme in EYFS supports and lends itself towards our long-term vision of physical literacy and an active life.  

 

KS1

We continue to work with children on developing their FMS through the Horizon PE Programme and start to introduce children to more sports. FMS is continued to be progressed and assessed through age-related expectations and children begin to sequence the learning of their FMS into fundamental sport skills (FSS)as they learn individual sports. Children are set personal challenges to motivate and stretch them within their learning. Staff demonstrate, discuss and allow children to try activities, which allows for the different learning styles of visual, verbal and kinaesthetic. A “give it a try” method is always adopted, and we celebrate individuals’ achievements in PE during assemblies and class time away from the PE environment. Our vision at the end of KS1 is that all children have managed to underpin the basic FMS to allow them to move into KS2 feeling confident in their ability to participate, actively learn and compete in a variety of sports.

 

KS2

During this final primary key stage, our curriculum focuses on a broad range of sports. The Horizon Programme switches from the learning of FMS, to a full FSS based scheme looking at several core British sports with strong exit routes for children into clubs outside of school. This allows for children to learn essential FSS to take part in and compete in a variety of sports. Staff continue to adopt the “give it a try” approach, and teaching is continued to be carried out with all learners in mind. Where a teacher's demonstration of complex sports skills isn’t possible or difficult for a member of staff, we use our online resource platform of Sportplan to show videos and explain FSS to children. All children have the opportunity to compete for their school, by accessing a full array of sports linked to School Games and our own Trust sports enrichment programme.

 

SEND/Disadvantaged

Our ambition is for all our pupils to access the full PE Curriculum.  These pupils will be supported through a range of intervention clubs and opportunities to represent the school in a variety of inclusive sports. With our PE Curriculums focused on skills-based learning, all children can take an active part in developing their skills at their own level within a lesson.

 

Swimming

We provide swimming instruction either in key stage 1 or key stage 2 and pupils will be taught to:

  • swim competently, confidently and proficiently over a distance of at least 25 metres
  • use a range of strokes effectively (for example, front crawl, backstroke and breaststroke)
  • perform safe self-rescue in different water-based situations

Teaching Style 

Excellent teaching of PE, within Bobby Moore, is based upon command, practice, reciprocal and self-check within an inclusive environment.  Teaching styles are pupil-centred which require pupils to be more independent and involved in the decision-making process.

 

Sports Enrichment

Sports enrichment is an essential part of the Bobby Moore Academy PE Curriculum, and helps to enhance the positive work taking place in our curriculum. Sports enrichment provides pupils with discrete time to engage in competitive sport and co-operative physical activities, in a range of increasingly challenging situations. Children will have the opportunities as the school grows to participate in a wealth of competitions: inter-house competitions within the school, inter-school competition through DRET Sport and School Games. We believe that participation in sporting activity is a key element of developing a school in which pupils are proud of the community in which they belong.  Great emphasis is therefore placed upon additional sporting opportunities beyond the lesson, including our after-school clubs, intra-house and inter-school competitions and festivals.

We aim to ensure children understand the importance of leading a healthy lifestyle and encourage them to do so through health and well-being education.

 

Cross Curricular

We value the importance of PE and thrive to exploit the cross curricular opportunities available. Staff understand the significance that positive experiences within sport and PE can hold to children’s future well-being.  Specifically, links with the PSHE, Science, Maths and the Oracy curriculum enables our pupils to apply skills such as fairness and respect, along with helping to improve children’s communication and further enhance knowledge on the human body, time and measurement. 

 

Impact

We are confident that our PE curriculum will have a positive impact on our pupils’ lives and equip children with the ability to make appropriate choices around their physical and mental health.  The curriculum will develop positive self-awareness in children as they become physically competent. They will also demonstrate a healthy attitude to competition, showing respect for individuals, teams, officials and coaches. 

By the end of the curriculum all pupils will build on prior achievement and increase confidence, self-esteem and their desire to learn.  As a result, pupils develop their ability to cooperate with others, communicate effectively and reflect and improve on previous performances.

This will be assessed through a multi-faceted approach including; half termly skills tracking, skilful questioning lesson by lesson, retrieval practices and summative disciplinary tasks within a competitive environment.  This learning will be moderated within the year at school and trust level.

Leaders will monitor the quality and impact of the PE curriculum through regular pupil voice, and assess the extent to which pupils are developing their sporting skills and knowledge. Our long-term vision is that all our students will have the confidence to continue in a sport or leisure activity for the rest of their lives. We feel our PE & school sport curriculum supports in developing the LTAD active healthy life concept, with our pupils having a positive outlook on taking part in physical activity.

 

  • Bishop Perowne Church of England College